It’s great to
        live in Dorval!

It’s great to
        live in Dorval!

THE CITY

Neighbours

Living in society inevitably means accepting the normal advantages and inconveniences of the neighbourhood. But since tolerance has its limits, a number of municipal by-laws have been enacted to promote harmonious relationships between neighbours in areas of municipal jurisdiction. However, let's point out that it is much more practical and wiser to get along with our neighbours. A good neighbourhood, just like good manners, is made up of many small things.

Access to your property
You must allow your neighbour access to your property if he needs such access for construction, repairs or maintenance work on his property. However, he must first notify you either orally or in writing. He must also repair any damage caused by this work and restore your property to its original condition.

Direct views
You may not have windows or doors with transparent glass, less than 1.50 meters from the dividing line between two properties. This rule does not apply to full doors or doors with translucent glass (through which objects cannot be clearly distinguished).

Water running off a roof
You must make sure that water, snow or ice from your roof falls on your land only and not on your neighbour's.

Fencing your land
If your project meets municipal by-law provisions, you are free to choose any type of fence, its height and colour, and the materials used if this construction is located entirely on your land and does not encroach on the dividing line between two properties. However, you and your neighbour may agree to build a common fence on the dividing line (see Fences for more details).

Trees
Sometimes branches or roots of one of your trees can extend over onto the neighbour's property causing him major problems. In this case, the neighbour may ask you to cut back the branches or roots. If one of your trees is threatening to fall on the neighbour's property, the neighbour may compel you to cut the tree down or shore it up.

Trees that you plant should also be a good distance from the dividing line between two properties so that neighbours will not be bothered by overgrown trees.

Information: 514 633-4125

To consult the integral version of the by-law concerning nuisances, please 
click here. (PDF - 46 KB)

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Administrative Structure
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City Profile
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Committees of the Council
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Message from the Mayor
Message from the Mayor
Mission and Values of the City
Mission and Values of the City
Municipal By-Laws
Municipal By-Laws
THE CITY

Neighbours

Living in society inevitably means accepting the normal advantages and inconveniences of the neighbourhood. But since tolerance has its limits, a number of municipal by-laws have been enacted to promote harmonious relationships between neighbours in areas of municipal jurisdiction. However, let's point out that it is much more practical and wiser to get along with our neighbours. A good neighbourhood, just like good manners, is made up of many small things.

Access to your property
You must allow your neighbour access to your property if he needs such access for construction, repairs or maintenance work on his property. However, he must first notify you either orally or in writing. He must also repair any damage caused by this work and restore your property to its original condition.

Direct views
You may not have windows or doors with transparent glass, less than 1.50 meters from the dividing line between two properties. This rule does not apply to full doors or doors with translucent glass (through which objects cannot be clearly distinguished).

Water running off a roof
You must make sure that water, snow or ice from your roof falls on your land only and not on your neighbour's.

Fencing your land
If your project meets municipal by-law provisions, you are free to choose any type of fence, its height and colour, and the materials used if this construction is located entirely on your land and does not encroach on the dividing line between two properties. However, you and your neighbour may agree to build a common fence on the dividing line (see Fences for more details).

Trees
Sometimes branches or roots of one of your trees can extend over onto the neighbour's property causing him major problems. In this case, the neighbour may ask you to cut back the branches or roots. If one of your trees is threatening to fall on the neighbour's property, the neighbour may compel you to cut the tree down or shore it up.

Trees that you plant should also be a good distance from the dividing line between two properties so that neighbours will not be bothered by overgrown trees.

Information: 514 633-4125

To consult the integral version of the by-law concerning nuisances, please 
click here. (PDF - 46 KB)

Administrative Structure
Administrative Structure
City Profile
City Profile
Committees of the Council
Committees of the Council
Council Meetings
Council Meetings
Council Members
Council Members
Electoral Districts
Electoral Districts
Fact Sheets
Fact Sheets
History
History
Maps
Maps
Message from the Mayor
Message from the Mayor
Mission and Values of the City
Mission and Values of the City
Municipal By-Laws
Municipal By-Laws

Neighbours

Living in society inevitably means accepting the normal advantages and inconveniences of the neighbourhood. But since tolerance has its limits, a number of municipal by-laws have been enacted to promote harmonious relationships between neighbours in areas of municipal jurisdiction. However, let's point out that it is much more practical and wiser to get along with our neighbours. A good neighbourhood, just like good manners, is made up of many small things.

Access to your property
You must allow your neighbour access to your property if he needs such access for construction, repairs or maintenance work on his property. However, he must first notify you either orally or in writing. He must also repair any damage caused by this work and restore your property to its original condition.

Direct views
You may not have windows or doors with transparent glass, less than 1.50 meters from the dividing line between two properties. This rule does not apply to full doors or doors with translucent glass (through which objects cannot be clearly distinguished).

Water running off a roof
You must make sure that water, snow or ice from your roof falls on your land only and not on your neighbour's.

Fencing your land
If your project meets municipal by-law provisions, you are free to choose any type of fence, its height and colour, and the materials used if this construction is located entirely on your land and does not encroach on the dividing line between two properties. However, you and your neighbour may agree to build a common fence on the dividing line (see Fences for more details).

Trees
Sometimes branches or roots of one of your trees can extend over onto the neighbour's property causing him major problems. In this case, the neighbour may ask you to cut back the branches or roots. If one of your trees is threatening to fall on the neighbour's property, the neighbour may compel you to cut the tree down or shore it up.

Trees that you plant should also be a good distance from the dividing line between two properties so that neighbours will not be bothered by overgrown trees.

Information: 514 633-4125

To consult the integral version of the by-law concerning nuisances, please 
click here. (PDF - 46 KB)

Administrative Structure
Administrative Structure
City Profile
City Profile
Committees of the Council
Committees of the Council
Council Meetings
Council Meetings
Council Members
Council Members
Electoral Districts
Electoral Districts
Fact Sheets
Fact Sheets
History
History
Maps
Maps
Message from the Mayor
Message from the Mayor
Mission and Values of the City
Mission and Values of the City
Municipal By-Laws
Municipal By-Laws
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